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VNS Therapy™ treatment in adult patients

The VNS Therapy System is indicated for use as an adjunctive therapy in reducing the frequency of seizures in patients whose epileptic disorder is dominated by partial seizures (with or without secondary generalization) or generalized seizures that are refractory to seizure medications.1

VNS Therapy™ treatment in adult patients

Studies have shown that VNS Therapy is an effective treatment option

No “honeymoon effect” with VNS Therapy2Change from baseline in total number of seizures per week was significantly greater with VNS Therapy + BMP vs BMP only (p=0.03)
Change from baseline in total number of seizures per week was significantly greater with VNS Therapy + Best Medical Practice (BMP) vs Best Medical Practice (BMP) only (p=0.03)
Seizure reduction that continues to improve over time3Seizure frequency significantly reduced from baseline at each recorded interval over 10 years (p<0.001) in patients with partial and generalized seizures
Seizure frequency significantly reduced from baseline at each recorded interval over 10 years (p<0.001) in patients with partial and generalized seizures

VNS Therapy requires a less invasive implantation procedure than other implantable devices for DRE4

Beyond seizures, VNS Therapy™ may reduce the impact of comorbidities in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy

In DRE, comorbidities are significant contributors to a reduced quality of life

VNS Therapy significantly reduces Depressive Symptoms in Patients with Drug-Resistant Epilepsy

VNS Therapy is associated with a reduction in depressive symptoms measured on Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS)6

Accidents and injuries reduced post-VNS Therapy

The incidence of hospitalisations, A&E visits, fractures and head trauma were significantly reduced post-VNS Therapy compared to pre-VNS Therapy periods7

Cognition comorbidity

Improved alertness, mood and memory in DRE patients treated with VNS Therapy8

VNS Therapy™ has been shown to be associated with a reduction of hospitalisations and health related events9
 

2-fold.JPG

Incidence rates 6 months pre and up to 3 years post VNS Therapy in 207 adolescents with DRE

Consider the comorbidities when treating DRE and how VNS Therapy could help to reduce the consequences of drug-resistant epilepsy for your patients.

VNS Therapy™ has proven safety and tolerability profile with side effects reducing over time

Safety Profile

VNS Therapy has no drug interactions and does not cause drug-related toxic central nervous system side effects.

Common side effects include hoarseness or change in voice tone, shortness of breath, sore throat, and coughing. Most side effects associated with VNS Therapy occur only during stimulation, tend to diminish over time, or are eliminated by adjusting parameter settings.

The most common side effect of the surgical procedure is infection.

For more safety information click here.

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References

1. VNS Therapy™ System Epilepsy Physician’s Manual April 2021, 76-0000-5600/8 (OUS)   2. Ryvlin P, et al. Epilepsia. 2014;55:893–900.   3. Elliott RE, et al. Epilepsy Behav. 2011;20:478–83.   4. Elliott RE, et al. Epilepsy Behav 2011;20(1):57‐63. Kawai K, et al. Epileptic Disord 2017;19(3):1‐12.  Heck et al 2014 Neurology. Skarpaas et al 2017. Salnova et al 2015 Neurology (SANTE).  VNS Therapy™ System Epilepsy Physician’s Manual April 2021, 76-0000-5600/8 (OUS)   5. Hamilton P, et al. Seizure. 2018;58:120–6. DeGiorgio CM, et al. Epilepsia. 2000;41:1195–200.   6. Spindler et al, 2019. Seizure, 69:77-79   7. Helmers et al, 2011. Jrnl of European Paediatric Neurology Society, 16:449-458   8. Sun et al, 2017. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology. 1-11   9. Helmers et al Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2012 Sep; 16(5):449-58